March 24, 2013

Subject from last session with students...



Watercolor, 28 x 37 cm.  Sold 





Subject and "mini demo" for study of branches of "mint in glass of water"...

Watercolor in mixed technique. Painting first "wet on wet" + adding paint on the first dried layers of paint with some more wet on wet on smaller parts; to confirm shapes and contrast built up in the first washes.
Not forgetting to make a quick study, drawing the subject in values, first and painting as loosely as possible while avoiding repetition of shapes (we tend to repeat shapes and gestures when we lack experience), studying the mixing of greens and trying to add other colors into these mostly green subject at first sight...

... to be continued...

(sorry for the poor quality of these iphone pictures)

3 comments:

Michele Clamp said...

This looks wonderful (and fiendishly difficult). Can I ask what made up your greens? And is that some sort of purple in the darks
?

Helen Ström said...

Hello Michele thank your for coming by!
You can make your greens with your green tubes, but adding a bit or red, yellow or blue (or a bit of several) depending on if you want a warm green or cool green. Mix, test and see. You make them more natural when adding these colors.
Otherwise you can also mix blue and yellow for a green... and brake it down to a duller green by adding red.
Be careful if you use tinting colors like the Windsor tubes called Windsor blue for example. They are strong and make deep colors or black if you mix blue, green and red for example. You can use Windsor blue green shade with a bit of yellow if you want it more yellowish or darker if you ad only red.
I just mix and try but I keep in mind the theory like if I mix the three primaries (blue, red and yellow) and I think cool or warm all along.
Here is a lot of greens and that needs a bit of red around as a complement. Sometimes I ad it to the mixes of green sometimes pure in a few places. The purple you see might be the mix on the paper when the some blue and red blends together.
I hope this explanation is clear. :)

Michele Clamp said...

Interesting. I have found that Windsor blue can be somewhat overpowering and when used just with something like cadmium lemon makes for an unnatural green. I've always kept away from adding red to avoid the dreaded mud but it sounds like I should go back and experiment.

Thanks for the reply - look forward to the next post!